Introduce Yourself!

Hey @Nleeguitar sounds like a great website. I’m not familiar with it. Were the comparisons photos and visuals or data comparisons?

Hi @laceymcnary great to get to know your work. Thanks for sharing. Louisville is such a wonderful place. Excited :person_cartwheeling:t2: to see folks from that part of the world joining the forum.

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Congrats on your new position @DebbieGS! Once the health protocols ease a bit :crossed_fingers:t2: we’re hoping to bring some in person We All Count workshops to Colorado.

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Thank you Heather.

Here’s the site I was looking for: https://www.gapminder.org/dollar-street

And here’s its parent site: https://www.gapminder.org/

warmly,

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Hello! I’m Alexandra, I’m based in Oxford, UK. I research violence prevention and family wellbeing focusing on intervention evaluation and implementation science. I work as a researcher for the International Rescue Committee (was previously based in Washington, D.C.) and am now also a PhD student at the University of Oxford.

I participated in Heather’s workshop a few years ago and am excited to be engaging in this community forum!

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@Nleeguitar Gapminder is awesome. Hans Rosling’s “The Best Stats You’ve Ever Seen” is still my all-time fav Ted Talk. You should add it to What Cool Data Equity Websites Should I Know About?

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Hi @Heather, it’s great to be here.

There are some elements of behaviour economics involved, especially when working with system partners. If you’re interested, you can see an evaluation report on the development of our social movement to try and get these longer term behaviour changes embedded across our county. ARC West evaluation

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Hi! I’m Sarah Eisele-Dyrli, I’m with CTData Collaborative. I started an Equity in Data Community of Practice in Connecticut, and have shared a lot from the We All Count newsletter with that group. I’m excited that there’s a forum now (since my schedule did not often allow me to attend the live learning community sessions) and look forward to learning from and sharing with all of you!

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This is awesome! Thank you so much @Alan

Hi @seiseledyrli your community of practice in Connecticut is blowing my mind :exploding_head: it’s so well put together. And thank you so much for joining the forum. We are really trying to find ways that feel like actually connecting across so many time zones and personal and professional commitments. I’m so glad you’re here. :blue_heart:

Welcome @ahblackwell! Great to see you again! We’re working a lot on violence prevention so I’m looking forward to picking your brain :smiling_face:

  • Mike Nutt
  • Raleigh, NC
  • Higher Education
  • NC State University Libraries
  • We are trying to help lead our campus to understand and practice data equity. Always happy to talk to folks doing similar work in academia!
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Thank you :slight_smile: We have a lot of data people here in CT that really want to transform the data culture of the state, it’s exciting to be a part of.

Hi Alyssa this is fascinating, thanks for sharing! Usually I think of social ecological frameworks as a sense-making framework (and that’s about all I do with ecology in the present time). The perspective you have shared to me is unique and intriguing. Are you familiar with the work of folks in the Turtle Island Institute

where Melanie Goodchild (Anishinaabe) has recently published a paper

https://jabsc.org/index.php/jabsc/article/view/577

on Relational Systems Thinking… I wonder if there might be something there for you and your work…?

And I have been learning/excited for some time after reading the concept of kincentric ecology from Enrique Salmón’s work:

https://www.jstor.org/stable/2641288?origin=JSTOR-pdf

Would to stay connected with what you’re doing and learning as it may be related to some work I’m involved with regarding ‘regenerative food systems,’ that includes prominently/centrally indigenous ways of knowing…

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No problem @Heather if you have any questions or feedback on this, do give me a shout.

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Hi everyone, my name is Megan and I’m a Data Services Librarian at a Midwest university in the USA (sector = higher education).

I help researchers (including students) with data management and data sharing. Besides library and information science I have experience with natural history collections and data. One of my goals is to start offering resources and teaching on this topic on my campus.

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Welcome @mikenutt so thrilled to see a person from the libraries! :books:

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Cool! I have been involved in a couple of program evals led by Malu Castro (see his bio on this page - Our Team | ELOKA), I don’t immediately see pubs/resources on his work indigenizing program evaluation, but his approach is inspiring.

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Thanks! Thanks for sharing those resources too - the kinship idea definitely comes up - how does the ‘microscope’ apply - seems less subject and object when all beings are relatives. I heard Deborah McGregor say a birch tree is a PI on her project - that opened my brain- what questions would the plants ask?

I’ve been lucky to be learning from Paulette Blanchard, Ren Green, Dominque David Chavez (she works with Stephanie Russo Carroll, who I saw mentioned here…), Teresa Romero, Val Small, Kalani Souza, Kyle Whyte, Dan Wildcat - my primary connection is through the Rising Voices community (https://risingvoices.ucar.edu/), and then the Indigenous Phenology Network that grew out of Rising Voices… where we do often discuss food forests/indigenous agro-eco approaches… happy to talk more.

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My name is Jerian Abel and I work in Portland, Oregon (USA). I co-direct a broadbased partnership focused on improving STEM Education outcomes for marginalized youth including BIPOC, families and youth navigating poverty, and girls. We’re called the Portland Metro STEM Partnership (www.pdxstem.org). Part of our work includes building the capacity of our partners to use data for Equity. I look forward to learning more from all of you!

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